Claying and protecting your paint - EquinoxForum.net: Chevy Equinox Forum
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post #1 of 59 (permalink) Old 06-24-2011, 02:37 PM Thread Starter
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Claying and protecting your paint

For those of you that have never tried claying your car, you are missing one of the most important steps in getting a fabulous shiny finish. Also, convince yourself with this little test: Clay the WINDSHIELD of your car and you will be AMAZED at the difference. Removing the surface contaminants lets your polish and or wax adhere much better and will result in a deeper look. New cars that are transported by train are notorious for have "rail dust" imbedded in the clearcoat. These look like little brown rust spots. Claying removes them. Also, claying is easier and faster than waxing. Every new car should be clayed to remove the surface contaminants from the train tracks "rails" and road contaminants from the car haulers. Then polish or wax to keep it looking good. Wax acts as a sacroficial coating that gets eaten up by sun, rain, acid rain, washing....and all the things that would first attack your paint.
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post #2 of 59 (permalink) Old 06-24-2011, 03:07 PM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

amen !!!

www.mothers.com

best finish ! when used with thier carnauba wax !!
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post #3 of 59 (permalink) Old 06-24-2011, 03:16 PM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry
For those of you that have never tried claying your car, you are missing one of the most important steps in getting a fabulous shiny finish. Also, convince yourself with this little test: Clay the WINDSHIELD of your car and you will be AMAZED at the difference. Removing the surface contaminants lets your polish and or wax adhere much better and will result in a deeper look. New cars that are transported by train are notorious for have "rail dust" imbedded in the clearcoat. These look like little brown rust spots. Claying removes them. Also, claying is easier and faster than waxing. Every new car should be clayed to remove the surface contaminants from the train tracks "rails" and road contaminants from the car haulers. Then polish or wax to keep it looking good. Wax acts as a sacroficial coating that gets eaten up by sun, rain, acid rain, washing....and all the things that would first attack your paint.
I wholeheartedly agree..! I also try to do this once a year. I then add a good polish after the claybar...next a good wax to top it off(I use my favorite brand...). After this once a year proccess...I use a quick spray detailing wax after each wash. Sounds like alot of work....but after the initial claybaring.. polishing and waxing..the wash and quick spray wax maintains the luster usually untill the late fall.


Meguiars Claybar Kit...Deep Crystal Polish...NXT Tech Wax 2.0...Ultimate Quik Detailer
http://www.meguiars.com/
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post #4 of 59 (permalink) Old 04-09-2012, 04:46 PM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

Any Turtle Wax users out there or am I living in the past with this? My father got me on it with my first car. I wanna try Nu Finish, though.

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post #5 of 59 (permalink) Old 04-09-2012, 06:54 PM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

I use Turtle wax products - especcially their Tar and Bug remover.. I use to use NuFinish for over 40 years and still like it I'd rather polish my car then wax it.

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post #6 of 59 (permalink) Old 04-09-2012, 09:12 PM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

I have a '99 Miata, that I store in the winter. Every spring I do:

Wash, claybar (windows and headlight lens), wash again. Use a cleaner wax, then Klasse All-in-one and finish with Klasse Glaze.

Rest of the year is wash and quick waxing...and in between wipe with California duster.

The clay is a great way to prep the surface..for the waxing or polishing.

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post #7 of 59 (permalink) Old 04-09-2012, 11:38 PM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

Clay cleans the finish but it provides no shine. It removed things embedded in the paint.

Once the finish is cleaned with the clay you need to polish it with various staged of polish depending on the condition of the paint damage. Then you need to seal it in a non cleaner wax.

Too many people get the false idea that the clay provides a polishing effect. It is a great tool but it only cleans.

Once or twice a year depending on how you maintain your vehicle is enough.

Formy black HHR I have never need to clay it as the surface has never gotten to the point it needed that deep of cleaning. If you feel the surface and it is not perfectly clean you will feel it. If it is clean it will be as smooth as glass. People who polish often do not need to clay unless there is some eviroment reason or overspray.

I went throught the clay traning when it first came out and I highly recomend it if you need it but do not just use it if the surface is in great condition as it will not improve the shine if the surface is already clean. Better to use this work with the application of another step of polish or hand glaze.
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post #8 of 59 (permalink) Old 07-05-2012, 09:29 AM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

IF I was doing myself and surface paint quality was questionable, NO clay bar for me, but rather use Mequiars Deep Crystal system paint cleaner or similar product, followed with Fire Glaze auto polish or similar long lasting advertised polish.

I might just do that on both black cars this year and forget the $80.00/car to have Ziebart do once a year. I have to get up the ambition FIRST.

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post #9 of 59 (permalink) Old 07-05-2012, 03:56 PM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

Well, to each his own, and having worked as a professional detailer in the past, I figured the finish on a new car wouldn't need the extra, deep-cleaning that a clay bar provides. Boy was I wrong. (I have a 2012 Equinox, BTW that is only a month & a half old) If you are unsure, I recommend purchasing one (a detail-specific clay bar, not the green Play-Do from your kid's toy box) & trying it on a small portion of your car. Usually the hood & top of the car are the most in need of deep cleaning. Follow the directions and compare the small area you clean (1'x1') with the rest of the surface and see if you can feel and see a difference. In a lot of cases the car WILL shine better, of you have a lot of surface contamination.

Remember though, a clay bar is meant to do one thing, clean. It will remove all kinds of crap off the surface of your paint/clear coat, including wax. Remember to follow-up your clay work with a good, quality wax. Everyone seems to have their favorite, so go with that. Please start with a clean car, that is as dust-free as possible.

I was surprised at how much nicer my car looks and how much smoother the surfaces of my Equinox are to the touch.

Highly recommend clay bar- even on a new car!
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post #10 of 59 (permalink) Old 07-05-2012, 06:07 PM
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Re: Claying and protecting your paint

The clay is a good tool but not a tool that needs to be used at all times.

Like stated clay is a cleaner and not a polish. Too many people think it as a polish and it does no such thing. You still need to polish the car after clay and then seal it with a quailty wax.

If you maintain your car well and often you may only need to clay once or twicw a year at best. My show car is maintained well and seldom left out for long so it never needs clayed.

Now a dailiy driver and anything near a city may need it more often. Often you can feel the surface and tell it it has any abrassiveness to it. If it is dead smooth there is no need to do any clay. Once you have clayed you know what paint should feel like if you forgot since your car was new.
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